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Posts tagged with ‘blizzard’
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So apparently, PCGamer had a Hearthstone beta key giveaway. They had 350 keys to toss to people, but get this, bots stole 100% of them. Now they are ending up on sites like Ebay. So hey, if you’re willing to spend around $200 on a key, today is your lucky day!
Users say there wasn’t even a button to redeem keys and all of a sudden this tweet showed up. So maybe we’ll get lucky and PCGamer will release a more secure method of distribution for next week. Happy Friday the 13th everyone!
[Read more here]

So apparently, PCGamer had a Hearthstone beta key giveaway. They had 350 keys to toss to people, but get this, bots stole 100% of them. Now they are ending up on sites like Ebay. So hey, if you’re willing to spend around $200 on a key, today is your lucky day!

Users say there wasn’t even a button to redeem keys and all of a sudden this tweet showed up. So maybe we’ll get lucky and PCGamer will release a more secure method of distribution for next week. Happy Friday the 13th everyone!

[Read more here]

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Class Action Suit Filed Against Activision Blizzard
Activision Blizzard is facing a lawsuit from many frustrated users, lead by one Benjamin Bell, claiming that Blizzard has been using "deceptively and unfairly" methods to acquire an alleged $26 million from consumers. The complaint specifically refers to the $6.50 Authenticator that Blizzard sells, but Bell claims that 

"Defendants negligently, deliberately, and/or recklessly fail to ensure that adequate, reasonable procedures safeguard the private information stored on this website. As a result of these acts, the private information of plaintiffs and class members has been compromised and/or stolen since at least 2007…"
"Most recently, on or about May 19, 2012, reports proliferated that class members’ Battle.net accounts had suffered a security breach (‘hack’) at the hands of unknown parties (‘hackers’), and on or about August 4, 2012, hackers massively breached Battle.net’s security and acquired the private information of all of defendants’ customers in the United States, as well as the remainder of North America, Latin America, Australia, New Zealand, and Southeast Asia."

Bell is charging for a class action seeking charges on consumer fraud, unjust enrichment, negligence, breach of contract and bailment, saying that Blizzard did not adequately inform or protect clients from breaches and for “tacking on” costs post-purchase of the game to protect the user’s personal information.
Blizzard responded to IGN with an e-mail with a statement (which can be read after the break).
[[MORE]]The statement is as follows:

"This suit is without merit and filled with patently false information, and we will vigorously defend ourselves through the appropriate legal channels.
We want to reiterate that we take the security of our players’ data very seriously, and we’re fully committed to defending our network infrastructure. We also recognize that the cyber-threat landscape is always evolving, and we’re constantly working to track the latest developments and make improvements to our defenses.
The suit’s claim that we didn’t properly notify players regarding the August 2012 security breach is not true. Not only did Blizzard act quickly to provide information to the public about the situation, we explained the actions we were taking and let players know how the incident affected them, including the fact that no names, credit card numbers, or other sensitive financial information was disclosed. You can read our letter to players and a comprehensive FAQ related to the situation on our website.
The suit also claims that the Battle.net Authenticator is required in order to maintain a minimal level of security on the player’s Battle.net account information that’s stored on Blizzard’s network systems. This claim is also completely untrue and apparently based on a misunderstanding of the Authenticator’s purpose. The Battle.net Authenticator is an optional tool that players can use to further protect their Battle.net accounts in the event that their login credentials are compromised outside of Blizzard’s network infrastructure. Available as a physical device or as a free app for iOS or Android devices, it offers players an added level of security against account-theft attempts that stem from sources such as phishing attacks, viruses packaged with seemingly harmless file downloads, and websites embedded with malicious code.
When a player attaches an Authenticator to his or her account, it means that logging in to Battle.net will require the use of a random code generated by the Authenticator in addition to the player’s login credentials. This helps our systems identify when it’s actually the player who is logging in and not someone who might have stolen the player’s credentials by means of one of the external theft measures mentioned above, or as a result of the player using the same account name and password on another website or service that was compromised. Considering that players are ultimately responsible for securing their own computers, and that the extra step required by the Authenticator is an added inconvenience during the log in process, we ultimately leave it up to the players to decide whether they want to add an Authenticator to their account. However, we always strongly encourage it, and we try to make it as easy as possible to do.
Many players have voiced strong approval for our security-related efforts. Blizzard deeply appreciates the outpouring of support it has received from its players related to the frivolous claims in this particular suit.”

Class Action Suit Filed Against Activision Blizzard

Activision Blizzard is facing a lawsuit from many frustrated users, lead by one Benjamin Bell, claiming that Blizzard has been using "deceptively and unfairly" methods to acquire an alleged $26 million from consumers. The complaint specifically refers to the $6.50 Authenticator that Blizzard sells, but Bell claims that 

"Defendants negligently, deliberately, and/or recklessly fail to ensure that adequate, reasonable procedures safeguard the private information stored on this website. As a result of these acts, the private information of plaintiffs and class members has been compromised and/or stolen since at least 2007…"

"Most recently, on or about May 19, 2012, reports proliferated that class members’ Battle.net accounts had suffered a security breach (‘hack’) at the hands of unknown parties (‘hackers’), and on or about August 4, 2012, hackers massively breached Battle.net’s security and acquired the private information of all of defendants’ customers in the United States, as well as the remainder of North America, Latin America, Australia, New Zealand, and Southeast Asia."

Bell is charging for a class action seeking charges on consumer fraud, unjust enrichment, negligence, breach of contract and bailment, saying that Blizzard did not adequately inform or protect clients from breaches and for “tacking on” costs post-purchase of the game to protect the user’s personal information.

Blizzard responded to IGN with an e-mail with a statement (which can be read after the break).

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"Paragon System" Coming to Diablo III
At level 60 and have nothing else to do in Diablo III? Well, the new Paragon System is here to help. Starting in patch 1.0.4, any experience gained after reaching level 60 will go towards new “Paragon” levels.
Each new Paragon level will get you basic stat increases, as well as an extra 3% Magic Find and Gold Find. The amount of experience points required to get to the first Paragon level will be on par with how many points it takes to get from 59 to 60.
Also, your character portrait will get a special border around its in-game party frame to show your achievements in the Paragon levels. You will get a totally new frame every 10 levels.
For more info on the Paragon levels, head to Blizzard’s blog.
(via: Game Informer)

"Paragon System" Coming to Diablo III

At level 60 and have nothing else to do in Diablo III? Well, the new Paragon System is here to help. Starting in patch 1.0.4, any experience gained after reaching level 60 will go towards new “Paragon” levels.

Each new Paragon level will get you basic stat increases, as well as an extra 3% Magic Find and Gold Find. The amount of experience points required to get to the first Paragon level will be on par with how many points it takes to get from 59 to 60.

Also, your character portrait will get a special border around its in-game party frame to show your achievements in the Paragon levels. You will get a totally new frame every 10 levels.

For more info on the Paragon levels, head to Blizzard’s blog.

(via: Game Informer)

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Review: Diablo III

by: Matthew Posivy

Well folks, it’s been a long wait. Since the year 2000, in fact (12 years…can you believe it?) since Blizzard released Diablo II. And what a memorable game it was, with all the nostalgia of the first game, but with more goodies and little surprised that made it even than its predecessor. The real question today is…does Diablo III bring the same concept to the table? Offering both the feeling that Diablo fans have been waiting for, AND new and exciting aspects that comes with today’s technology? Stay a while and listen, and find out.

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