Bioshock Infinite Artist Dispute Leads To Character Innovation
At one point during the production of Bioshock Infinite, there was a bit of a dispute with one of the main artists on the team designing characters and environments in the game. One of the more spiritual artists was so offended by the character of Comstock- the main antagonist- that they actually wrote a resignation letter mid-production Ken Levine discusses some of the issues he had writing the character:

“[Comstock] was one of the toughest characters for me to write because I don’t have a religious background, let alone the darker side of his beliefs; the racist side of his beliefs. So I really had a lot of trouble writing him for a long time.”

Levine goes on to discuss how the disagreement led to characterization in the game itself:

“I ended up having a conversation with [the artist]; my first impulse was; “I don’t want this guy to go because he was a good guy and a talented guy,” and we actually ended up having a long talk. He was an extremely religious guy, and when we started talking, I realized that something I could connect to was a notion of forgiveness […] and thinking about how I would incorporate the power of that notion to Comstock- into his world- was, to me, the key. Because who hasn’t done things that they don’t want to be forgiven for?” 

The artist ended up staying with the project.

Bioshock Infinite Artist Dispute Leads To Character Innovation

At one point during the production of Bioshock Infinite, there was a bit of a dispute with one of the main artists on the team designing characters and environments in the game. One of the more spiritual artists was so offended by the character of Comstock- the main antagonist- that they actually wrote a resignation letter mid-production Ken Levine discusses some of the issues he had writing the character:

“[Comstock] was one of the toughest characters for me to write because I don’t have a religious background, let alone the darker side of his beliefs; the racist side of his beliefs. So I really had a lot of trouble writing him for a long time.”

Levine goes on to discuss how the disagreement led to characterization in the game itself:

“I ended up having a conversation with [the artist]; my first impulse was; “I don’t want this guy to go because he was a good guy and a talented guy,” and we actually ended up having a long talk. He was an extremely religious guy, and when we started talking, I realized that something I could connect to was a notion of forgiveness […] and thinking about how I would incorporate the power of that notion to Comstock- into his world- was, to me, the key. Because who hasn’t done things that they don’t want to be forgiven for?” 

The artist ended up staying with the project.